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The Magellanic Cloud Calibration of the Galactic Planetary 

Nebula Distance Scale 



Letizia Stanghellini 
National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Av., Tucson, AZ 85719 
QQ ' lstanghelliiii@noao.edu 

o 
o 

CN ■ Richard A. Shaw 

National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Av., Tucson, AZ 85719 

shawSnoao . edu 



6 



O 






C^ 



Eva Villaver^ 
Space Telescope Science Institute, 3800 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 

villaverOstsci . edu 



ABSTRACT 



<^ , Galactic planetary nebula (PN) distances are derived, except in a small number of cases, 

Q^ ' through the calibration of statistical properties of PNe. Such calibrations are limited by the 

CN . accuracy of individual PN distances which are obtained with several non-homogeneous methods, 

each carrying its own set of liabilities. In this paper we use the physical properties of the PNc in 
the Magellanic Clouds, and their accurately known distances, to recalibrate the Shklovsky/Daub 
C^^ ' distance technique. Our new calibration is very similar (within 1%) of the commonly used 

^— ^ , distance scale by Cahn et al. (1992), although there are important differences. We find that 

neither distance scale works well for PNe with classic (" butterfly" ) bipolar morphology, and while 
the radiation bounded PN sequences in both the Galactic and the Magellanic Cloud calibration 
have similar slopes, the transition from optically thick to optically thin appears to occur at 
higher surface brightness and smaller size than that adopted by Cahn et al. The dispersion 
^ ' in the determination of the scale factor suggests that PN distances derived by this method are 

uncertain by at least 30%, and that this dispersion cannot be reduced significantly by using 
better calibrators. We present a catalog of Galactic PN distances using our re-calibration which 
can be used for future applications, and compare the best individual Galactic PN distances to 
our new and several other distance scales, both in the literature and newly recalibrated by us, 
finding that our scale is the most reliable to date. 

Subject headings: Planetary nebulae: general; distances 

1. Introduction Only ~40 Galactic PNe have distances that have 

been determined individually with reasonable ac- 

The uncertainty associated with distances mea- ^^^^cy. Distances to Galactic PNe can be deter- 
surements of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) is a mined individually in various ways, including clus- 
major obstacle to the advancement of PN research. ^^^ membership (Chen et al. 2003, CHW03; Alves 
et al. 2000, ABLOO), by measuring the rate of their 

lAffiliated with the Hubble Space Telescope Division of expansion (e. g., Liller & LiUer 1968, LL68; Hajian 

the European Space Agency 



et al. 1995, HTB95), by the reddening method 
(e. g., Gathier et al. 1986, GPP96; Kaler & Lutz 
1985, KL85), and by measuring their spectroscopic 
parallax (CiarduUo et al. 1999, C99) or trigono- 
metric parallax (Harris et al. 2007, Hea07). 

For the remaining >1800 Galactic PNe (Acker 
et al. 1992) one has to rely on statistical distance 
scales, whose calibrations are based on the relia- 
bility of the individually known PN distances, and 
the validity of a general correlation that links the 
distance-dependent to the distance-independent 
physical properties of PNe. The Cahn, Kaler, 
& StangheUini (1992, CKS) distance scale of 
Galactic PNe is based on an attempt by Daub 
(1982, D82) to improve Shklovsky's distance scale 
(Shklovsky 1956a, 1956b) for optically thick neb- 
ulae. Shklovsky's distance scale assumes that all 
PNe have equal (observed) ionized mass. D82 as- 
sumed that Shklovsky's constant mass approach 
was still valid, but only for those PNe that are 
optically thin to the Lymann continuum radiation 
emitted by the central stars (density bounded). 
For the optically thick (radiation bounded) PNe, 
D82 based the distance scale on a calibration of 
an ionized mass versus surface brightness relation. 
CKS improved D82's calibration with the use of 
a larger number of calibrators (PNe with known 
individual distance) , and calculated the statistical 
distances to 778 Galactic PNe. 

Since its publication, distances from the CKS 
catalog have been used preferentially and widely 
in the literature. Other statistical methods that 
have been commonly used include those by Ma- 
ciel (1984), Zhang (1995, Z95), van de Steene 
& Zijlstra (1995, vdSZ), Schneider & Buckley 
(1996, SB96) and Bensby & Lundstrom (2001, 
BLOl). All these distance scales rely on a set 
of Galactic calibrators whose distances are mostly 
derived from reddening or expansion properties, 
or from the assumption of Galactic Bulge mem- 
bership, with all the consequent uncertainties. 
With the publication over the past decade of crit- 
ical physical parameters for a large sample of 
Magellanic Cloud PNe (Shaw et al. 2001, 2006; 
StangheUini et al. 2002, 2003), including highly 
accurate H/3 fluxes, physical dimensions, mor- 
phologies, and extinction constants, we have the 
opportunity to assess and improve the distance 
scale for Galactic PNe. In this paper we take 
advantage of the wealth of Magellanic Cloud PN 



data to re-calibrate the CKS distance scale, as 
well as other distance scales for comparison. Ho- 
mogeneously determined photometric radii from 
HST of a PN sample with low Galactic redden- 
ing are the best way to determine any relation 
that involves apparent diameters. Furthermore, 
the relatively recent publication of trigonometric 
and spectroscopic parallax and cluster member- 
ship distances to Galactic PNe allow us to test 
with unprecedented reliability our own and other 
distance scales. 

The construction of any statistical distance 
scale for PNe is composed of three fundamen- 
tal steps: the selection of a method that has some 
physical or empirical basis, the selection of a set 
of calibrator PNe, for which distances have been 
determined by some independent means, and an 
analysis of the applicability of the calibration to 
a wide variety of PNe. Until now it has been 
difficult to compare the viability various meth- 
ods, since their calibrations and applications have 
varied so widely. In §2 we describe in detail the 
Shklovsky/Daub/CKS distance scale and the su- 
periority of the Magellanic Cloud PNe as calibra- 
tors. We also derive our new calibration of this 
method and assess its inherent uncertainties. In 
§3 we discuss the physical underpinning of the 
CKS distance method in light of recent advances 
in modeling the evolution of PNe. In §4 we take 
a closer look at the viability of various methods 
for determining independent distances to Galactic 
PNe (i.e., the set that had previously been used 
as calibrators), and discuss the applicability of 
the Magellanic Cloud distance scale to Galactic 
PNe. In §5 we recalibrate the most used statisti- 
cal distance methods with the Magellanic Cloud 
PNe, and then compare the accuracy of these 
methods to one another using the best indepen- 
dently determined distances to Galactic PNe. We 
conclude in §6 with our final prescription and rec- 
ommendation for determining statistical distances 
to Galactic PNe. 

2. The Magellanic Cloud Calibration and 
the New PN Distance Catalog 

The CKS statistical distance scale is based on 
the calibration of the relation between D82's ion- 
ized mass 



fi = (2.266 X IQ-^^D'^e^Py/^ 
and the optical thickness parameter 

r - log—, 



(1) 



(2) 



where D is the distance to the PN in parsecs, 9 
is the nebular radius in arcsec, and F is the nebular 
flux at 5 GHz. The parameter /x increases as the 
ionization front expands into the nebula. Once a 
PN becomes density bounded, fi remains constant 
for the rest of the observable PN lifetime. 

By calculating fi and t for several PNc with 
known distances, dimensions, and fluxes, CKS de- 
rived the ^-T relation: 



log;U = r-4, T < 3.13 



log n 



-0.87, r >3.13, 



(3a) 
(36) 



where Eq. 3a holds for PNe of high surface 
brightness, and Eq. 3b for PNe with low surface 
brightness. 

The calibration of the above distance scale was 
based upon 19 Galactic PNe with independent 
distances with comparatively poor accuracy. At 
the time when the CKS paper was written there 
were hardly any Magellanic Cloud PNe with ac- 
curately measured diameters, and the distances 
to the Magellanic Clouds were also quite uncer- 
tain. We can now re-calibrate the distance scale 
using the nebular parameters relative to the LMC 
and SMC PNe observed by us with the Hubble 
Space Telescope (HST) (Shaw et al. 2001, 2006; 
Stanghellini et al. 2002, 2003). In order to deter- 
mine T and (1 for Magellanic Cloud PNe we use 
a transformation between the 5 GHz and the H/3 
fluxes (Eq. 6 in CKS), since radio fluxes are not 
available for Magellanic Cloud PNe. All other pa- 
rameters are available in our HST paper series. 
Note that we use the photometric radius as the 
proper measure of the nebular dimension, which 
is defined as the radius that includes 85% of the 
flux in a monochromatic emission line. 

We have adopted a distance to the LMC of 50.6 
kpc (Freedman et al. 2001; Mould et al. 2000), 
which is accurate to ^^10% (Benedict et al. 2002). 
The variation in the adopted distance when ap- 
plied to individual objects can be easily estimated 
given that the three dimensional structure of the 



LMC has been well established (Freeman, lUing- 
worth, & Oemler 1983; van der Marel & Cioni 
2001). The LMC can be considered a flattened 
disk with a tilt of the LMC plane to the plane 
of the sky of 34° (van der Marel & Cioni 2001). 
Freeman, Illingworth, & Oemler (1983) derived a 
scale height of 500 pc for an old disk population. 
The scale height of young objects is between 100 
to 300 pc (Feast 1989). Using the scale height 
of an old disk population the 3D structure of the 
LMC introduces a variation in the adopted dis- 
tance smaller than 1% from object to object and 
therefore has been neglected in the calibration. 

For the SMC we have used a distance of 58.3 
kpc (Westerlund 1997). The accuracy of this dis- 
tance is not as well established as for the LMC. 
Moreover, the SMC is irregular with a large in- 
trinsic line of sight depth (between 6 and 12 kpc: 
Crowl et al. 2001) which varies with the location 
within the galaxy. We have estimated an average 
line of sight depth of 5 kpc for the PNe in our sam- 
ple by combining the span of the positions (400 pc 
in right ascension and 2 kpc in declination) of the 
PNc with respect to the optical center of the SMC 
with the dispersion in the distance to the SMC 
derived by Crowl et al. (2001) using SMC clusters 
positions. The distance uncertainty introduced by 
this depth in the SMC is roughly 9%, still low to 
significantly affect the result but one order of mag- 
nitude larger than the one obtained for the LMC. 
In this respect we consider LMC PNe to be bet- 
ter calibrators than the SMC PN for the distance 
scale. 

In Figure 1 we show the LMC PNe on the log ji 
- T plane. We have calculated r and log /i as 
explained above, and assumed Dlmc=50.6 kpc. 
In the Figure we plot the different morphological 
types with different symbols, following the classi- 
fication in Shaw et al. (2001, 2006). To guide the 
eye we have plotted, on the figure, the Galactic 
distance scale fit from CKS (solid line). The opti- 
cally thick sequence of LMC PNc is very tight for 
T <2.1, and most LMC PNe are optically thin for 
T >2.1. The fitted value of the function for op- 
tically thin LMC PNe is almost identical to that 
of Galactic PNe if we exclude bipolar planetary 
nebulae. The broken line in Figure 1 corresponds 
to the Magellanic Cloud fit of the optically thick 
sequence of LMC PNe (see Eq. 4a and 4b be- 
low). Similarly, in Figure 2 we show the same plot 



of Figure 1, but for SMC PNe. The morphofogy 
and sizes of the nebulae are from Stanghelhni et 
al. (2003). Even with the scarcity of data points, 
the thick PN sequence is well defined by SMC PNe, 
and it is identical to that of the LMC PNe. 

The observed ionized masses of bipolar PNe in 
both Figures 1 and 2 appear mostly well above the 
constant ionized mass line. The parameters fi and 
T have been calculated with the photometric radii 
of the PNe, that can be very different from the 
isophotal radii in the case of PNe with large lobes. 
Furthermore, bipolar PNe might be optically thick 
for most of their observed lifetime (Villaver et al. 
2002a), and thus are not the ideal calibrators for 
the optically thin PNe branch of the log n - t 
relation. In deriving the distance scale based on 
Magellanic Cloud PNe we thus exclude PNe with 
bipolar morphology. This leave us with 70 Mag- 
ellanic Cloud calibrators, a very large number of 
PNe with individual distances when compared to 
the 19 calibrators in CKS. In Figure 3 we show 
the Magellanic Cloud calibration of the PN dis- 
tance scale, where open symbols are LMC PNe 
and filled symbols are SMC PNe, and where we 
exclude bipolar PNe. Note that we have assumed 
that the ionized mass for optically thin PNe is con- 
stant, as in D82 and CKS. 

The fit to the distance scale based on the Mag- 
ellanic Cloud PNe (this paper, hereafter SSV) is: 

log Ai = 1.21 r- 3.39, T < 2.1 (4a) 

log ^ = -0.86, T > 2.1 (46) 

The solid line in Figure 3 shows this relation. 
The separation between optically thick and thin 
PNe is very obvious from the figure, and the op- 
tically thick sequence is much better defined here 
than in CKS, thanks to the use of the best calibra- 
tors available now. The optically thick sequence 
has been derived by least-square fit, and has cor- 
relation coefficient Rxy=0.8. The optically thin 
sequence is determined by the average of the log 
/Lt for r > 2.1. Using another estimate of the cen- 
tral tendency will change the horizontal scale by 
less than 5%, which is well within the uncertainty. 
Furthermore, if we were to fit the data points of 
Figure 3 with just one line for all r we would have 
a very poor correlation (Rxy=0.14), which rein- 
force the evolutionary scheme of optically thick to 



thin PNe, proposed by D82 to improve Shklovsky's 
method. 

By examining Figure 3 we infer that: (1) Our 
analysis allows us to confirm the CKS distance 
scale for optically thin PNe; (2) the optically thick 
sequence is very well defined by the Magellanic 
Cloud PNe and it is different from that of CKS; 

(3) the new statistical distance for optically thin 
PNe increases slightly the assumed ionized mass, 
such that distances for optically thin nebulae are 
tipically 1% larger compared to those computed 
using the CKS calibration. (4) bipolar PNe do 
not follow the empirical relation, and their ionized 
mass actually increases steadily with t, confirming 
that they stay in the ionization bound state for 
much longer than PNe with other morphological 
types. The probable reason why the bipolar PN 
relation does not flatten out for r >2.1 is because 
they are the progeny of the more massive stars and 
they are expected to remain optically thick (given 
a combination of the large circumstellar densities 
and fast evolution of the central star). 

By using the SSV distance scale we calculated 
the statistical distances to all non-bipolar PNe 
in the LMC and the SMC. We obtain distri- 
butions that are nicely narrow, with mean val- 
ues (and dispersions), Dlmc=50.0±7.5 kpc and 
DsMC=57.5±5.5 kpc, that are within 1% of the 
distances to the Magellanic Clouds. 

We applied our new distance scale to the large 
sample of Galactic PNe in the original CKS cata- 
log, and present the revised distances in Table 1. 
Column (1) gives the usual name as in CKS, col- 
umn (2) gives the calculated r, columns (3) and 

(4) give the angular radius and the flux used in 
the calculation, and column (5) gives the distance 
to the PNe. Note that the fluxes in (4) are the 5 
GHz fluxes from CKS when available, or their H/3 
equivalents. 

3. The Physics of the Statistical Distance 
Scale 

As CKS pointed out, the assumption of con- 
stant ionized mass for optically thin PNe (or that 
it can be computed for optically thick PNe with a 
one-parameter model) would seem to be a doubt- 
ful proposition since the progenitor stars vary in 
mass by nearly an order of magnitude. CKS min- 
imized the significance of the variation in ionized 



mass by pointing out that distances so derived 
depend only on the square-root of the assumed 
mass. One might also expect that the ionized mass 
would be fairly directly correlated with the pro- 
genitor mass. However, hydrodynamical models 
of the co-evolving PN and central star by Villavcr 
et al. (2002a) show that the decline of gas den- 
sity with radius is generally quite steep (except 
within the bright inner shell of gas) over a wide 
range of progenitor masses and during the entire 
visible lifetime of the nebula. The implication is 
that, for optically thin nebulae, the bulk of the 
mass exists in the faint, low-density, outer halo. 
Since the volume emissivity of recombination lines 
is proportional to the square of the gas density, the 
massive nebular halo contributes very little to the 
observed emission. Most published values for PN 
masses assume a constant density for the gas, one 
that is only representative of the bright inner shell, 
leaving the bulk of the PN mass unaccounted for. 
In part for these reasons, ionized masses derived in 
this way reflect only a modest fraction of the total 
mass of the nebula, such that the assumption of 
a constant mass is sufficiently accurate to render 
the Shklovsky distance method useful. 

We have shown that the distance method of 
CKS is empirically sound, and derived the scale 
factor for optically thin PNe to that from obser- 
vations of Magellanic Cloud PNe. It is important 
to note the significance of the dispersion in the 
PN masses (expressed in the /i parameter) about 
the mean in the calibration shown in Figure 3. 
The 1 — CT deviation about the mean value is 0.28, 
which translates to a corresponding uncertainty in 
the distance of about 30%. We regard this value 
as a rough estimate of the minimum uncertainty 
that may be associated with the distance to an 
individual PN derived using this methodology. It 
is important to note that the uncertainty in the 
distance scale cannot be reduced with improved 
calibrator nebulae, since the distance uncertainty 
is of order 10% (i.e., of order the size of the sym- 
bols in Figure 3). The scatter in the data results 
from genuine variations in the ionized masses of 
the calibrator nebulae, and quantifies the funda- 
mental limitation in this technique. 

The new PN distance scale (SSV) is very similar 
to that of CKS, with the exception of the transi- 
tion between optically thick and optically think 
stages. From Eq. 4b, the definition of /i, and the 



relation D — 206265 Rp^/B (where RpN is the 
linear nebular radius in pc) we can determine the 
radius at which the PN becomes optically thin. 
For T =2.1 we obtain i?pN ~0.06 pc. The same 
calculation to determine the PN radius at which 
the thick to thin transition occurs by using Eq. 3b 
and r=3.13 gives i?PN ~ 0.09 pc. The uncertainty 
in the determination of r at transition, and thus of 
RpN, depends on the scatter of the ionized mass 
calibrators used in CKS. The new calibration is 
much more reliable. 

The metallicities of the LMC and SMC are, on 
average, of the order of half and a quarter that of 
the solar mix respectively (Russell & Bessell 1989; 
Russell & Dopita 1990). The AGB wind is fikely 
to be dust driven, therefore it has a strong depen- 
dency on metallicity. It is then expected that LMC 
and SMC stars with dust-driven winds lose smaller 
amounts of matter (Winters et al. 2000) dur- 
ing the AGB phase than their Galactic counter- 
parts. The mass- loss history during the AGB de- 
termines the circumstcllar density structure that 
will eventually constitute the PN shell (Villavcr et 
al. 2002b). A reduced mass- loss rate during the 
AGB has the effect of decreasing the density of the 
circumstcllar envelope prior of PN formation. 

Furthermore, after the envelope is ejected, the 
remnant central star leaves the AGB and its ef- 
fective temperature increases. The stellar rem- 
nant becomes a strong emitter of ionizing pho- 
tons, responsible for ionizing the nebula. The 
mechanism that drives the wind during the central 
star phase (with velocities a few orders of mag- 
nitude higher than that experienced during the 
AGB phase) is the transfer of photon momentum 
to the gas through absorption by strong resonance 
lines (Pauldrach ct al. 1988). The efficiency of 
this mechanism depends on metallicity, thus it is 
expected to be less efficient in Magellanic Cloud 
central stars than in the Galactic ones, with cor- 
respondingly lower escape velocities for the winds, 
and a decreased efficiency in shell snow-plow. 

As has been shown by Villaver et al. (2002a), 
the propagation of the ionization front determines 
the density structure of the nebula early in its evo- 
lution, while the pressure provided by the hot bub- 
ble has no effect at this stage. The propagation 
velocity of the Stromgren radius, which ultimately 
determines the transition from the optically thick 
to the optically thin stages, depends mainly on 



the ionizing flux from the star and on the density 
of the neutral gas. Given the dependency of the 
AGB mass-loss rates on metallicity, the ionization 
front will encounter a lower neutral density struc- 
ture in Magellanic Cloud PNe than in Galactic 
PNe. This would tend to make the transition from 
optically thick to thin at a smaller radius in Mag- 
ellanic Cloud PNe than in Galactic PNe. The fact 
that our Magellanic Cloud calibration of the CKS 
scale occurs at smaller radii than that derived by 
CKS is probably coincidence. On the other hand, 
if we really could determine empirically the tran- 
sition radius as a function of metallicity, we would 
expect two different thick sequences for the SMC 
and the LMC PNe, given their different metal- 
licity, and yet the sequences are almost identical 
(Figs. 1 and 2). That is, we do not see the ef- 
fects of metallicity on our distance scale, and that 
is applicable to Galactic PNe as well. We discuss 
below (§4) how the newly derived distances match 
extremely well with the best individual distances 
to Galactic PNe independently of metallicity. 

4. Comparison of our Distance Scale to In- 
dividual Galactic PN Distances 

We have assessed that our new calibration of 
the PN distance scale is very similar to that of 
CKS, but with a revision in the transition between 
the radiation bounded and the density bounded 
stages. The comparison between the CKS and 
the SSV scales suffers from the fact that part of 
the CKS calibrators are obsolete, and that new 
Galactic calibrators have become available. It is 
worthwhile to compare the SSV scale with the best 
available individual distances to Galactic PNe to 
date before we confirm the validity of the new cal- 
ibration. 

In Table 2 we give the best set of individual 
Galactic PN distances available to date. Column 
(1) gives the common name; columns (2) and (3) 
give the best individual distance and, where avail- 
able, its uncertainty; columns (4) and (5) give re- 
spectively the statistical distances for the same 
PNe from CKS and the SSV; columns (6) and 
(7) give the distance determination method (CM 
for cluster membership, P for parallax, E for ex- 
pansion, R for reddening, see explanations below) 
and its reference. We have selected a sample of 
individual Galactic PN distances based on the lit- 



erature, and whose statistical distances have been 
calculated by CKS and can be derived for the SSV 
calibration as well. 

The best methods to get individual PN dis- 
tances are (1) trigonometric parallax, (2) the use 
of a spectroscopic companion of the PN central 
star, which allows to derive the spectroscopic par- 
allax, and (3) the membership of the PN in an 
open or globular cluster. Apart from trigonomet- 
ric parallaxes, that are applicable only for nearby 
PNe, the distance to the PN is that of a compan- 
ion or a cluster, whose uncertainties are typically 
much lower than those related to other methods 
for PN distances. In the past decade there have 
been two major studies of PN parallaxes. C99 
used HST imaging to determine central star com- 
panions of a PN sample, obtaining ten probable 
associations and the relative spectroscopic paral- 
laxes. We list all of these in Table 2, except for 
A 31, where only a lower limit to the distance 
is given, and A 33 and K 1-27, whose distances 
seem to be controversial in C99. Hea07 published 
trigonometric parallaxes of several Galactic PNe. 
Following the discussion in IIea07, we include all 
their final determinations in Table 2, including the 
uncertainties. Planetary nebulae whose distances 
have been derived through cluster membership are 
the PN in Ps 1, whose distances has been recal- 
culated by ABLOO, and that in the open cluster 
NGC 2818, whose distance has been estimated by 
CHW03. It is worth noting that Mermilliod et 
al. (2001) found that the radial velocity of the 
NGC 2818 PN is shghtly lower than that of the 
cluster, making its membership marginally ques- 
tionable. 

Since CKS was published there have been other 
PNe observed in clusters, including JaFul and 
JaFu2 (Jacoby et al. 1997), and a PN in M 22 
(Monaco et al. 2004), but their distances are not 
included in Table 2 either because their cluster 
membership is not definitive or because their na- 
ture is still uncertain, as described in detail in the 
discovery papers. 

An alternative method for PN distances is the 
determination of the secular PN expansion, a 
method that had its renaissance with the use of 
the accurate relative astrometry afforded by the 
HST. In this category we found distances to sev- 
eral PNe by Hajian et al. (1993, 1995, 1996; 
HBT93, HBT95, HT96), Palen et al. (2002, 



Pea02), Gomez et al. (1993, GRM93), and also 
the work by LL68. Among the distances deter- 
mined by expansion we have only listed in Table 2 
those deemed reliable by the authors listed above. 
In particular, in Pea02 there are several distances 
determined by different expansion algorithms, and 
if the results are very different by different meth- 
ods for the same PN we have excluded them. Un- 
certainties in expansion distances, when available, 
are much higher than those of parallaxes or clus- 
ter membership, and the method is intrinsically 
less reliable, given the impossibility of following 
the PN acceleration history, and the modeling dif- 
ficulty given unknown process as such as differen- 
tial mass-loss. 

Finally, a very rough individual distance can 
be derived in some cases by studying the red- 
dening patches around the PN and then build- 
ing reddening-distance plots for the known stars 
surrounding the PN. This method, although pro- 
viding several data-points in the literature, is the 
most uncertain given the inhomogeneity of the 
Galactic ISM. GPP96 derived reddening distances 
for several PNe, and we used in Table 2 only the re- 
liable ones, as deemed by the authors. We have ex- 
cluded NGC 2346, since the scatter in its distance- 
reddening plot is overly large. KL85 also published 
several PN distances by the same method, and we 
included their results in Table 2. 

In Figure 4 we plot the data of Table 2 on the 
T - log /i plane, drawing also the CKS and the 
SSV distance scales (note that the scales of Fig- 
ures 3 and 4 are different). It is interesting to 
note that the best data points, those of the PNe 
whose distances have been determined via paral- 
lax or cluster membership, follow very well the 
SSV calibration, and they are less compatible with 
that of CKS. Naturally, the CKS calibration was 
based principally on reddening and expansion dis- 
tances, since very few parallaxes were available 
at that time, and we can see that the thinning 
sequence determined by the data points relative 
to expansion or reddening distances is compatible 
with the CKS calibration (but these individual dis- 
tances have much lower reliability than the paral- 
laxes and cluster memberships represented by the 
filled symbols). While the SSV seems to be the 
best statistical scale to be used for Galactic PNe, 
its preference, for optically thick PNe, over the 
CKS scale is based only on one data point (the 



parallax at r <2.1). But let us recall here that the 
filled symbols are not the calibrators of the SSV 
scale, rather they are the Galactic PNe with best 
individual distances to date, used for comparison, 
while the calibration is based on ~70 data points 
whose errorbars would be smaller than the sym- 
bols. 

In Figure 5 we show the direct comparison of 
the individual PN distances and those from the 
SSV calibration, where the correspondence of the 
parallax and cluster membership individual dis- 
tances with the SSV distances is remarkable. It 
is worth noting that the two lower-left filled cir- 
cles, those for which the parallax and statistical 
distances do not coincide within 30%, are A 7 and 
A 31; both are very large nebulae, whose diameters 
are larger than the radio beam used to detect the 
5 GHz flux (Milne 1979), and whose flux densities 
are deemed to be uncertain. In Figure 6 we show 
the distribution of the relative differences of the 
SSV and individual distances versus r for the four 
methods of deriving individual distances. The thin 
vertical lines represent the t=2.1 and t=3.1, i.e., 
the thick-to-thin PN transition for the CKS and 
SSV scales. We could conclude that the SSV scale 
fails to reproduce the individual distances for PNe 
around the transition between thick to thin, but 
this failure seems to pertain only to the compari- 
son with expansion and reddening distances, and 
it does not occur for the comparison with parallax 
and cluster membership distances. 

5. Comparison of Statistical Distance Scales 

We compare the relative merits of the new SSV 
scale, calibrated on Magellanic Cloud PNe, in re- 
lation to other distance scales in the literature. 
We compare the statistical distances from differ- 
ent methods to individual Galactic PN distances, 
by using only the best individual PN distances of 
Table 2, those from parallax and cluster member- 
ship. We also calculate the distances to all LMC 
and SMC PNe using the statistical methods, then 
we compare the resulting averages with the actual 
distances to the Clouds. It is worth recalling that 
all old scales have been calibrated with Galactic or 
Bulge PNe, thus we expect a lower reproducibility 
of the Magellanic Cloud distances. 

For all scales we give in Table 3: in column (1) 
the reference, in column (2) the statistical method. 



in column (3) the correlation coefficient between 
statistical and individual PN distances, in column 
(4) the mean relative difference between the sta- 
tistical and individual distances, in column (5) the 
relative difference between the median distances to 
Large Magellanic Cloud PNc and the actual LMC 
distance, in column (6) the same relative differ- 
ence, but for the SMC PNe. Statistical distance 
scales in the literature use in this comparison are 
those by CKS, vdSZ, Z95, SB96, and BLOf . 

The statistical scheme that best compares with 
the best individual distances is the SSV scale, with 
higher (Rxy=0.99) correlation and lower median 
difference between statistical and individual dis- 
tances than any other scale, and best reproduces 
the Magellanic Cloud distances. This is hardly a 
surprise, since for the first time it was possible to 
calibrate a distance scale with absolute calibrators 
from the Magellanic Clouds. By comparison, the 
correlation coefficients between the distances from 
the CKS, vdSZ, Z95, SB96, and BLOl scales are 
always lower, and the median of the relative dif- 
ferences are higher. 

We also want to test whether PN distances de- 
rived with other distance scales, if recalibrated 
with the Magellanic Cloud PNe, would compare 
better than the SSV scale to the best individual 
distances of Galactic PNe. First, we consider the 
relation between the brightness temperature and 
the linear nebular radius, which vdSZ calibrated 
with Galactic bulge PNe. Our new calibration of 
the relation is 

log D{Ti,) = 3.49 - 0.35 log 9 - 0.32 log F, (5) 

based on a fit of the log Tb - log Rpn relation 
(RPN = [0 D)/206265). We also cahbrate the log 
Mion - log RpN relation as in Maciel & Pottasch 
(1980), Z95, and BLOl, and found, by assuming 
that the filling factor is 0.6, 



log D(Mion) = 3.45 - 0.34 log 9 - 0.33 log F. (6) 

Finally, we also recalibrate with the Magel- 
lanic Cloud PNe the relation between the surface 
brightness, I=F/(7r 9^), and Rpn, as in SB96, and 
obtained: 



The possibility of building a distance scale 
based on a log I - log RpN calibration was men- 
tioned by Stanghellini et al. (2002), and also used 
by Jacoby (2002). 

All three relations used to derive the distance 
scales in Eqs. (5), (6), and (7) have high corre- 
lation coefficients (Rxy ^ 0.8). In these relations, 
excluding the bipolar PNe does not change the co- 
efficients by more than 5%, thus their exclusion as 
calibrators is irrelevant. 

Using the scales in Eqs. (5), (6), and (7) we 
have calculated the distances for those Galactic 
PNe whose individual distances are known either 
through a trigonometric or spectroscopic parallax, 
or by cluster membership. In Table 3 we give the 
comparison between these newly calibrated scales 
and the individual distances of PNc. We also give 
the estimates for the LMC and SMC distances, 
and we infer that the SSV scale is superior to all 
other scales here recalibrated with the Magellanic 
Cloud PNe as well. We then plot in Figure 7 the 
relative difference between the statistical and in- 
dividual distances for the scales recalibrated with 
Magellanic Cloud PNe. The filled symbols repre- 
sent the SSV scale, triangles are the distances from 
the Tb-RpN relation (Eq. 5), crosses represent the 
log Mion - log RpN scale (Eq. 6), pentagons are 
the distances from Eq. (7), based on the log I 
- log RpN relation. Wc sec that the SSV scale is 
the best possible Galactic statistical distance scale 
with the calibrators and comparisons available to 
date. Since the log I - log RpN relation works for 
bipolar PNe, it might be used to determine the 
distance to bipolar PNe instead of the SSV scale. 

6. Conclusion 

The wealth of new data available that de- 
scribe the physical parameters of Magellanic PNe 
has allowed us to check and re-calibrate the 
Shklovsky/Daub/CKS statistical distance scale, 
which is most commonly used in the literature, 
and provide distances of 645 Galactic PNe follow- 
ing the new distance scale calibration (Table 1). 
To calculate the SSV distance for other PNe, or 
for the same PNe but using other parameters than 
those in CKS, given 9 and F, the 5 GHz fiux, one 
can use the following equations: 



log D{I) ^ 3.68 - 0.50 log 9 - 0.25 log F. (7) 



log Dssv == 3.06 + 0.37 log 9 - 0.68 log F,t < 2.1 

(8a), 
log DssY = 3.79 - 0.6 log - 0.2 log F,t > 2.1 

(85). 

If the 5 GHz flux is not available for the given 
PN, one can use Eq. (6) in CKS to derive the 
equivalent 5 GHz flux from the H/? flux. 

In this paper we have used recent data on PNe 
in the Magellanic Clouds to construct a set of 
calibrators for which the distances are known to 
high absolute accuracy (^ 10%), and for which 
the dispersion among the distances is extraordi- 
narily small (a few percent). Furthermore, the 
great distance of these nebulae allows us to estab- 
lish a distance scale factor that is insensitive to 
uncertainties in distances to Galactic PNe that are 
drawn from a heterogeneous, nearby (few hundred 
pc) sample; a local sample has generally been nec- 
essary given the limited range over which many in- 
dependent distance methods (notably trigonomet- 
ric and expansion parallaxes) can provide accu- 
rate distances. In addition, we use consistent and 
reliable means to determine angular sizes (from 
photometric radii), and the H/3 fluxes and extinc- 
tion constants, derived from HST calibrations, are 
among the most reliable in the literature. There 
has never been a better set of calibrators for sta- 
tistical distance determinations. For comparison, 
we selected Galactic PNe where the independent 
distances are the best available (including recently 
published data), and we evaluated the reliability 
of various independent distance methods by the 
degree to which they are consistent with our dis- 
tance scale. 

With this study we show that: (1) the distance 
scale as calibrated from the Magellanic Cloud PNe 
is very similar to that derived by CKS; (2) our re- 
vised distance scale agrees superbly with the most 
accurate distances measured for individual Galac- 
tic PNe. We also show that other methods of 
statistical distance determination generally do not 
yield results that are better than this statistical 
method; (3) the distance scale does not work for 
PNe with bipolar morphology, and we believe this 
is because progenitors of bipolars are often not 
fully ionized during the course of PN evolution 
(the log I - log RpN relation could be used instead 
for these PNe) ; (4) with the Magellanic Cloud cali- 



bration we provide a more robust physical basis for 
why the Shklovsky/Daub distance scale works, de- 
spite wide variations in the expected ionized mass; 
we also show that the recalibration of other dis- 
tance scales with Magellanic Cloud PNe might not 
work as well as the recalibrated Shklovsky/Daub 
distance scale; (5) we point out that the dispersion 
in the distance scale is an inherent property of the 
method, and cannot be reduced significantly by 
using better calibrators; (6) the radiation-bounded 
sequence for Magellanic Cloud PNe may termi- 
nate at higher surface brightness than previously 
derived. It seems that the new sequence and the 
radiation bounded to density bounded transition 
does not depend on metallicity very much, as it is 
the same for the LMC and the SMC PNe; the best 
available data show that the Magellanic Cloud cal- 
ibration of this sequence is entirely consistent with 
Galactic PNe. 

Many thanks to Bruce Balick for scientific 
discussion on the importance of the PN dis- 
tance scale, and an anonymous referee for giv- 
ing suggestions that improved the paper. Letizia 
Stanghellini is grateful to the Aspen Center for 
Physics for their hospitality on July 2006, when 
parts of this paper were completed. 

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This 2-coluinn preprint was prepared with the AAS lATJiiX 
macros v5.2. 



11 



Table 1 
Catalog of Galactic PN Distances 



Name 


r 


e 


pa 


Dssv 
[pc] 


NGC40 


3.46 


18.20 


0.460 


1249 


NGC246 


5.31 


112.00 


0.248 


475 


NGC650 


5.24 


69.20 


0.110 


746 


NGC1360 


5.82 


192.00 


0.222 


351 


NGC1501 


4.08 


25.90 


0.224 


1167 


NGC1514 


4.59 


50.20 


0.262 


760 


NGC1535 


3.31 


9.20 


0.166 


2305 


NGC2022 


3.62 


9.70 


0.091 


2518 


NGC2346 


4.54 


27.30 


0.086 


1369 


NGC2371 


4.33 


21.80 


0.090 


1554 


NGC2392 


3.93 


22.40 


0.237 


1259 


NGC2438 


4.83 


35.20 


0.073 


1215 


NGC2440 


3.42 


16.40 


0.411 


1359 


NGC2452 


3.81 


9.40 


0.055 


2838 


NGC2610 


4.58 


17.20 


0.031 


2215 


NGC2792 


3.16 


6.50 


0.116 


3050 


NGC2818 


4.69 


20.00 


0.033 


1998 


NGC2867 


2.93 


8.00 


0.299 


2228 


NGC2899 


4.97 


45.00 


0.086 


1014 


NGC3132 


3.94 


22.50 


0.230 


1263 


NGC3195 


4.66 


20.00 


0.035 


1975 


NGC3211 


3.51 


8.00 


0.080 


2901 


NGC3242 


3.22 


18.60 


0.835 


1094 


NGC3587 


5.64 


100.00 


0.091 


621 


NGC3699 


4.48 


22.40 


0.067 


1620 


NGC3918 


2.62 


9.40 


0.857 


1639 


NGC4071 


5.18 


31.50 


0.026 


1596 


NGC4361 


4.45 


40.50 


0.230 


887 


NGC5189 


4.59 


70.00 


0.507 


546 


NGC5307 


3.22 


6.30 


0.095 


3235 


NGC5873 


3.08 


3.50 


0.041 


5445 


NGC5882 


2.77 


7.00 


0.334 


2362 


NGC5979 


2.74 


4.00 


0.117 


4075 


NGC6026 


4.72 


16.90 


0.022 


2398 


NGC6058 


5.03 


13.20 


0.007 


3538 


NGC6072 


4.43 


35.00 


0.181 


1017 


NGC6153 


2.98 


12.30 


0.632 


1482 


NGC6210 


3.01 


8.10 


0.256 


2282 


NGC6302 


2.77 


22.30 


3.403 


741 



12 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


T 


9 

n 


pa 


Dssv 

[pc] 


NGC6309 


3.06 


6.90 


0.167 


2736 


NGC6326 


3.30 


6.00 


0.073 


3511 


NGC6337 


4.19 


23.50 


0.143 


1354 


NGC6369 


2.59 


14.00 


2.002 


1089 


NGC6439 


2.67 


2.50 


0.053 


6330 


NGC6445 


3.48 


16.60 


0.368 


1380 


NGC6543 


2.59 


9.40 


0.899 


1623 


NGC6563 


4.42 


21.50 


0.070 


1646 


NGC6565 


3.29 


4.50 


0.042 


4660 


NGC6567 


2.68 


4.40 


0.161 


3610 


NGC6572 


2.16 


7.20 


1.429 


1736 


NGC6578 


2.65 


4.30 


0.166 


3638 


NGC6620 


3.40 


2.50 


0.010 


8836 


NGC6629 


2.93 


7.50 


0.266 


2372 


NGC6720 


4.10 


34.60 


0.384 


880 


NGC6741 


2.49 


3.90 


0.197 


3728 


NGC6751 


3.85 


10.50 


0.063 


2585 


NGC6765 


4.91 


19.00 


0.018 


2334 


NGC6772 


4.74 


32.40 


0.076 


1266 


NGC6778 


3.66 


7.90 


0.055 


3150 


NGC6781 


4.54 


53.00 


0.323 


706 


NGC6803 


2.52 


2.80 


0.094 


5273 


NGC6804 


3.84 


15.70 


0.142 


1726 


NGC6807 


2.17 


1.00 


0.027 


12550 


NGC6818 


3.04 


9.10 


0.304 


2055 


NGC6826 


3.20 


12.70 


0.404 


1590 


NGC6842 


4.25 


23.70 


0.126 


1380 


NGC6852 


4.59 


14.00 


0.020 


2736 


NGC6853 


4.94 


170.00 


1.325 


264 


NGC6879 


3.10 


2.50 


0.020 


7692 


NGC6881 


2.30 


2.50 


0.124 


5340 


NGC6884 


2.49 


3.80 


0.186 


3830 


NGC6886 


2.77 


3.80 


0.098 


4354 


NGC6891 


3.00 


5.10 


0.103 


3613 


NGC6894 


4.50 


22.00 


0.061 


1669 


NGC6905 


4.42 


20.20 


0.062 


1751 


NGC7008 


4.53 


42.80 


0.217 


869 


NGC7009 


3.03 


14.10 


0.735 


1325 


NGC7026 


2.91 


7.50 


0.277 


2352 



13 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


T 


9 
II 


rpa 


Dssv 

[pc] 


NGC7048 


4.91 


27.50 


0.037 


1613 


NGC7094 


5.72 


47.50 


0.017 


1358 


NGC7139 


5.30 


38.00 


0.029 


1396 


NGC7293 


5.70 


402.00 


1.292 


159 


NGC7354 


2.83 


10.00 


0.597 


1698 


NGC7662 


2.57 


7.70 


0.634 


1962 


IC289 


3.81 


18.40 


0.212 


1448 


IC351 


3.15 


3.50 


0.035 


5620 


IC972 


5.51 


23.50 


0.007 


2488 


IC1295 


5.42 


54.10 


0.045 


1034 


IC1297 


2.85 


3.50 


0.069 


4908 


IC1454 


5.95 


17.00 


0.001 


4207 


IC1747 


3.12 


6.50 


0.128 


2991 


IC2003 


2.97 


3.30 


0.047 


5489 


IC2120 


4.24 


23.50 


0.126 


1388 


IC2149 


2.36 


4.20 


0.309 


3258 


IC2165 


2.50 


4.00 


0.202 


3653 


IC2448 


3.17 


5.00 


0.067 


3985 


IC2553 


2.77 


4.50 


0.137 


3679 


IC2621 


2.10 


2.50 


0.197 


4867 


IC3568 


3.64 


9.00 


0.075 


2738 


IC4191 


3.06 


7.00 


0.170 


2703 


IC4406 


3.56 


10.00 


0.110 


2381 


IC4593 


3.25 


6.40 


0.092 


3225 


IC4634 


2.76 


4.20 


0.122 


3924 


IC4637 


3.42 


9.30 


0.132 


2396 


IC4642 


3.66 


8.30 


0.060 


3006 


IC4663 


3.66 


7.20 


0.045 


3467 


IC4673 


3.56 


7.40 


0.060 


3220 


IC4699 


3.10 


2.50 


0.020 


7692 


IC4732 


2.83 


2.50 


0.037 


6801 


IC4776 


2.88 


3.50 


0.065 


4966 


IC5148 


5.71 


60.00 


0.028 


1068 


IC5217 


2.98 


3.40 


0.048 


5369 


Al 


5.55 


23.50 


0.006 


2534 


A2 


5.62 


15.50 


0.002 


3967 


A3 


6.12 


30.00 


0.003 


2585 


A4 


5.43 


10.00 


0.001 


5621 


A5 


6.80 


63.70 


0.003 


1658 



14 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


T 


9 


pa 


Dssv 

[pc] 


A6 


6.45 


93.00 


0.012 


967 


A7 


6.28 


382.00 


0.305 


218 


A8 


5.15 


30.00 


0.026 


1648 


A9 


6.02 


18.50 


0.001 


3999 


AlO 


5.20 


10.00 


0.002 


5075 


All 


5.01 


16.00 


0.010 


2901 


A12 


4.58 


18.50 


0.036 


2058 


A13 


6.47 


76.30 


0.008 


1191 


A14 


5.38 


16.40 


0.004 


3353 


A15 


5.67 


17.00 


0.002 


3691 


A16 


6.59 


70.50 


0.005 


1363 


A17 


5.79 


21.40 


0.003 


3100 


A18 


5.50 


36.60 


0.017 


1588 


A19 


6.12 


33.50 


0.003 


2310 


A20 


5.78 


33.50 


0.007 


1978 


A23 


5.63 


27.00 


0.007 


2289 


A24 


6.54 


177.40 


0.036 


530 


A26 


5.82 


20.00 


0.002 


3376 


A28 


7.13 


134.00 


0.005 


920 


A30 


6.85 


63.50 


0.002 


1702 


A31 


6.97 


486.00 


0.102 


235 


A32 


6.05 


67.00 


0.016 


1118 


A33 


6.71 


134.00 


0.014 


758 


A34 


6.79 


145.00 


0.013 


728 


A35 


6.37 


386.00 


0.255 


225 


A36 


5.89 


183.50 


0.174 


379 


A39 


6.72 


87.00 


0.006 


1175 


A40 


5.76 


17.00 


0.002 


3859 


A41 


4.83 


9.20 


0.005 


4644 


A43 


5.76 


40.00 


0.011 


1634 


A44 


5.50 


28.00 


0.010 


2074 


A46 


5.91 


31.70 


0.005 


2211 


A50 


5.86 


13.50 


0.001 


5091 


A51 


5.19 


33.50 


0.029 


1503 


A53 


4.05 


15.50 


0.086 


1924 


A54 


6.10 


28.00 


0.002 


2736 


A55 


5.58 


24.00 


0.006 


2519 


A59 


5.61 


43.00 


0.018 


1425 


A60 


5.70 


37.00 


0.011 


1721 



15 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


T 


e 

It 


pa 


Dssv 
[pc] 


A62 


4.70 


80.50 


0.522 


499 


A65 


6.45 


54.00 


0.004 


1671 


A66 


6.09 


133.40 


0.058 


572 


A67 


5.82 


33.50 


0.007 


2011 


A69 


5.01 


11.00 


0.005 


4206 


A70 


5.17 


21.00 


0.012 


2376 


A71 


5.48 


79.00 


0.083 


729 


A72 


6.00 


63.70 


0.016 


1151 


A73 


5.86 


36.60 


0.007 


1875 


A75 


5.28 


28.50 


0.017 


1845 


A77 


4.15 


32.90 


0.308 


949 


A78 


6.37 


53.50 


0.005 


1622 


A79 


5.12 


27.10 


0.022 


1801 


A80 


6.59 


54.80 


0.003 


1752 


A81 


5.92 


16.50 


0.001 


4283 


A82 


6.09 


40.50 


0.005 


1887 


A84 


6.05 


47.50 


0.008 


1579 


AGCAR 


3.56 


17.80 


0.348 


1338 


Apl-11 


4.41 


6.00 


0.006 


5847 


Apl-12 


4.26 


6.00 


0.019 


4610 


Ap2-1 


3.53 


16.40 


0.320 


1429 


Ap2-1 


4.58 


50.00 


0.262 


762 


Ba-1 


5.05 


19.00 


0.013 


2483 


BD+30 


2.10 


4.00 


0.511 


3034 


BIM 


3.10 


2.30 


0.017 


8354 


BV-1 


4.99 


20.80 


0.018 


2211 


Cnl-5 


3.05 


3.50 


0.044 


5369 


Cn2-1 


2.35 


1.70 


0.052 


8008 


Cn3-1 


2.57 


2.50 


0.067 


6040 


CRL618 


3.33 


6.00 


0.067 


3572 


DdDm-1 


2.22 


0.50 


0.006 


25700 


Fg-1 


3.67 


8.00 


0.055 


3127 


Hal-1 


3.14 


1.20 


0.004 


16400 


Hal-3 


2.79 


7.90 


0.405 


2113 


Hal-8 


2.57 


1.70 


0.031 


8881 


Hal-11 


3.44 


3.00 


0.013 


7515 


Hal-14 


3.30 


3.30 


0.022 


6389 


Hal- 15 


3.17 


2.20 


0.013 


9052 


Hal- 17 


2.13 


0.50 


0.006 


25700 



16 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


r 


e 

It 


pa 


Dssv 

[pc] 


Hal-20 


2.56 


2.00 


0.044 


7514 


Hal-23 


2.35 


1.40 


0.035 


9750 


Hal-24 


3.70 


4.30 


0.015 


5892 


Hal-27 


3.18 


2.60 


0.018 


7673 


Hal-33 


2.82 


1.40 


0.012 


12060 


Hal-39 


2.37 


0.90 


0.014 


15290 


Hal-40 


2.36 


1.90 


0.063 


7200 


Hal-41 


3.86 


4.80 


0.013 


5686 


Hal-42 


2.92 


2.90 


0.040 


6126 


Hal-43 


3.18 


1.50 


0.006 


13300 


Hal-54 


2.13 


1.00 


0.029 


12340 


Hal-59 


3.94 


3.00 


0.004 


9421 


Hal-60 


3.11 


1.90 


0.011 


10170 


Hal-65 


3.21 


2.60 


0.017 


7780 


Hal-66 


3.86 


3.30 


0.006 


8284 


Hal-67 


3.51 


3.00 


0.011 


7770 


Ha2-1 


2.68 


2.80 


0.065 


5677 


Ha2-7 


3.29 


2.10 


0.009 


10020 


Ha2-10 


2.30 


1.00 


0.020 


13330 


Ha2-10 


2.42 


1.00 


0.015 


14060 


Ha2-15 


3.76 


1.70 


0.002 


15360 


Ha2-16 


4.91 


8.40 


0.003 


5268 


Ha2-17 


3.10 


1.80 


0.010 


10720 


Ha2-20 


2.95 


1.90 


0.016 


9447 


Ha2-24 


3.21 


2.30 


0.013 


8814 


Ha2-25 


3.68 


2.20 


0.004 


11460 


Ha2-33 


4.11 


4.00 


0.005 


7655 


Ha2-41 


4.26 


3.80 


0.003 


8632 


Ha2-43 


3.49 


4.50 


0.026 


5114 


Ha3-29 


3.90 


6.00 


0.018 


4646 


Ha4-1 


3.83 


1.50 


0.001 


18050 


Hb-4 


2.18 


2.50 


0.166 


5037 


Hb-5 


2.81 


10.00 


0.620 


1685 


Hb-7 


2.73 


2.00 


0.030 


8109 


Hb-8 


3.49 


2.50 


0.008 


9239 


Hel-5 


5.39 


18.00 


0.005 


3081 


Hel-6 


4.39 


11.20 


0.020 


3119 


He2-5 


2.49 


1.50 


0.029 


9702 



He2-7 4.63 22.30 0.047 1744 



17 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


T 


6 
1/ 


pa 


Dssv 

[pc] 


Hc2-ll 


3.98 


32.50 


0.445 


888 


Hc2-15 


3.73 


11.90 


0.105 


2165 


Hc2-21 


2.56 


1.20 


0.016 


12490 


Hc2-26 


4.56 


19.00 


0.040 


1983 


Hc2-28 


3.70 


5.00 


0.020 


5075 


Hc2-29 


3.91 


7.00 


0.024 


3999 


Hc2-35 


3.02 


2.50 


0.024 


7416 


Hc2-36 


3.81 


11.00 


0.075 


2427 


Hc2-37 


4.37 


11.50 


0.023 


3004 


Hc2-50 


4.09 


5.90 


0.011 


5151 


He2-51 


3.15 


4.50 


0.057 


4384 


Hc2-63 


2.88 


1.50 


0.012 


11570 


Hc2-73 


2.32 


2.00 


0.076 


6733 


Hc2-85 


2.97 


5.10 


0.112 


3555 


Hc2-99 


4.21 


8.50 


0.018 


3770 


Hc2-102 


3.39 


4.50 


0.033 


4891 


Hc2-103 


4.35 


10.00 


0.018 


3419 


Hc2-105 


4.84 


15.50 


0.014 


2764 


Hc2-107 


3.19 


5.00 


0.065 


4009 


Hc2-108 


3.56 


5.50 


0.033 


4336 


Hc2-109 


3.54 


3.70 


0.016 


6373 


He2-lll 


3.30 


6.00 


0.073 


3511 


Hc2-112 


3.41 


7.30 


0.082 


3050 


Hc2-114 


5.09 


18.30 


0.011 


2626 


He2-116 


5.58 


25.50 


0.007 


2369 


Hc2-119 


4.47 


26.40 


0.094 


1372 


He2-120 


4.45 


13.50 


0.026 


2653 


He2-123 


2.28 


2.30 


0.110 


5750 


Hc2-125 


2.65 


1.50 


0.020 


10410 


Hc2-132 


4.10 


8.90 


0.025 


3434 


He2-138 


2.81 


3.50 


0.076 


4813 


Hc2-141 


3.57 


6.90 


0.051 


3469 


He2-142 


2.30 


1.80 


0.065 


7400 


He2-143 


2.35 


2.60 


0.120 


5250 


Hc2-146 


3.42 


11.00 


0.186 


2024 


Hc2-149 


3.12 


1.50 


0.007 


12970 


He2-152 


2.79 


5.50 


0.196 


3036 


Hc2-153 


5.17 


6.50 


0.001 


7744 


Hc2-155 


3.48 


7.30 


0.070 


3148 



18 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


T 


6 
1/ 


pa 


Dssv 

[pc] 


He2-157 


2.48 


1.50 


0.030 


9637 


He2-158 


3.17 


1.00 


0.003 


19890 


He2-159 


3.60 


5.00 


0.025 


4853 


He2-161 


3.80 


5.00 


0.016 


5313 


He2-163 


5.07 


10.00 


0.003 


4772 


He2-164 


3.42 


8.00 


0.097 


2791 


He2-165 


5.20 


25.00 


0.016 


2023 


He2-169 


3.74 


10.90 


0.086 


2374 


He2-175 


3.21 


3.30 


0.027 


6141 


He2-180 


2.23 


0.90 


0.019 


14350 


He2-186 


2.63 


1.50 


0.021 


10350 


He2-262 


2.60 


1.60 


0.026 


9540 


He2-429 


2.41 


2.10 


0.069 


6659 


He2-432 


2.17 


1.10 


0.033 


11420 


He2-433 


3.66 


4.00 


0.014 


6231 


He2-435 


3.19 


2.40 


0.015 


8349 


He2-453 


4.52 


11.20 


0.015 


3313 


Hf2-1 


3.99 


4.70 


0.009 


6165 


Hul-l 


3.03 


2.50 


0.023 


7460 


J320 


3.39 


3.60 


0.021 


6120 


J900 


2.51 


3.00 


0.110 


4903 


Jn-1 


7.05 


166.00 


0.010 


716 


Kl-1 


5.22 


21.70 


0.011 


2362 


Kl-3 


3.88 


46.00 


1.117 


599 


Kl-4 


4.93 


23.00 


0.025 


1943 


Kl-7 


5.76 


17.00 


0.002 


3859 


Kl-8 


5.02 


39.50 


0.059 


1183 


Kl-12 


5.14 


18.50 


0.010 


2659 


Kl-13 


5.67 


83.00 


0.059 


758 


Kl-14 


6.20 


23.50 


0.001 


3413 


Kl-16 


5.07 


47.00 


0.076 


1013 


Kl-20 


5.95 


17.00 


0.001 


4207 


Kl-21 


5.23 


14.50 


0.005 


3535 


Kl-22 


6.45 


90.50 


0.012 


997 


Kl-32 


6.00 


29.50 


0.003 


2479 


K2-1 


5.92 


66.00 


0.021 


1071 


K2-2 


6.50 


207.00 


0.054 


446 


K2-4 


6.37 


343.00 


0.202 


253 


K2-5 


4.88 


12.30 


0.008 


3561 



19 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


r 


e 

n 


pa 


Dssv 
[pc] 


K3-1 


3.70 


2.50 


0.005 


10150 


K3-2 


2.41 


1.40 


0.031 


9991 


K3-3 


3.47 


5.50 


0.041 


4144 


K3-4 


4.10 


8.10 


0.021 


3762 


K3-5 


4.52 


5.00 


0.003 


7416 


K3-7 


3.14 


3.20 


0.030 


6116 


K3-9 


3.89 


3.80 


0.007 


7280 


K3-11 


2.72 


1.50 


0.017 


10800 


K3-13 


2.63 


1.90 


0.034 


8156 


K3-14 


2.32 


0.50 


0.005 


26880 


K3-16 


3.37 


2.00 


0.007 


10910 


K3-17 


2.74 


7.40 


0.398 


2205 


K3-18 


3.09 


2.00 


0.013 


9600 


K3-23 


3.03 


1.50 


0.008 


12460 


K3-24 


3.17 


3.10 


0.026 


6405 


K3-27 


4.63 


8.20 


0.006 


4752 


K3-30 


2.70 


1.70 


0.023 


9427 


K3-37 


2.60 


1.30 


0.017 


11760 


K3-38 


2.52 


1.50 


0.025 


9978 


K3-40 


2.90 


2.00 


0.020 


8794 


K3-41 


2.17 


0.25 


0.002 


50140 


K3-48 


3.02 


3.00 


0.034 


6201 


K3-55 


2.87 


4.10 


0.090 


4231 


K3-57 


2.83 


3.20 


0.060 


5325 


K3-58 


2.87 


2.40 


0.031 


7221 


K3-61 


3.41 


3.00 


0.014 


7405 


K3-63 


3.23 


3.50 


0.029 


5836 


K3-65 


3.80 


2.50 


0.004 


10610 


K3-66 


2.43 


1.10 


0.018 


12860 


K3-67 


3.73 


7.50 


0.042 


3430 


K3-68 


4.46 


6.00 


0.005 


6002 


K3-70 


2.63 


0.80 


0.006 


19390 


K3-72 


5.55 


11.50 


0.001 


5168 


K3-77 


3.32 


3.80 


0.027 


5618 


K3-78 


3.05 


2.20 


0.017 


8540 


K3-82 


4.32 


12.50 


0.030 


2700 


K3-83 


3.59 


2.50 


0.006 


9631 


K3-87 


3.90 


3.00 


0.004 


9291 


K3-90 


3.77 


4.50 


0.014 


5814 



20 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


r 


e 


pa 


Dssv 
[pc] 


K3-91 


4.82 


5.00 


0.001 


8519 


K3-92 


4.93 


6.50 


0.002 


6871 


K3-94 


4.26 


5.00 


0.005 


6570 


K4-16 


3.48 


1.50 


0.003 


15270 


K4-30 


2.51 


1.30 


0.021 


11280 


K4-39 


2.65 


1.00 


0.009 


15640 


K4-41 


2.78 


1.50 


0.015 


11070 


K4-45 


3.25 


4.50 


0.046 


4576 


K4-47 


4.31 


3.90 


0.003 


8609 


K4-48 


2.54 


1.10 


0.014 


13520 


K4-58 


4.30 


5.00 


0.005 


6696 


K4-60 


2.85 


10.00 


0.560 


1719 


LoTr5 


4.29 


5.30 


0.006 


6321 


Ml-1 


3.58 


3.00 


0.009 


8002 


Ml-4 


2.28 


2.00 


0.084 


6600 


Ml-7 


3.77 


4.40 


0.013 


5963 


Ml-8 


4.17 


9.20 


0.023 


3423 


Ml-9 


2.20 


1.10 


0.030 


11580 


Ml-13 


3.82 


5.00 


0.015 


5375 


Ml-14 


2.61 


2.40 


0.056 


6416 


Ml-16 


2.51 


1.50 


0.028 


9770 


Ml-17 


2.72 


1.50 


0.017 


10800 


Ml-18 


5.82 


15.20 


0.001 


4433 


Ml-19 


2.42 


1.30 


0.026 


10810 


Ml-22 


4.01 


3.00 


0.003 


9770 


Ml-25 


2.59 


2.30 


0.055 


6605 


Ml-27 


3.01 


4.00 


0.063 


4612 


Ml-28 


4.04 


7.40 


0.020 


4011 


Ml-29 


2.82 


4.10 


0.102 


4127 


Ml-31 


2.93 


3.50 


0.057 


5098 


Ml-32 


2.96 


3.80 


0.064 


4741 


Ml-33 


2.38 


1.90 


0.060 


7280 


Ml-34 


3.93 


5.60 


0.015 


5042 


Ml-35 


2.68 


2.60 


0.057 


6093 


Ml-39 


2.20 


2.00 


0.100 


6374 


Ml-41 


4.22 


38.00 


0.350 


848 


Ml-42 


3.45 


4.10 


0.024 


5512 


Ml-44 


3.25 


2.00 


0.009 


10320 


Ml-46 


3.15 


5.50 


0.086 


3580 



21 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


r 


e 


pa 


Dssv 

[pc] 


Ml-47 


3.35 


2.80 


0.014 


7718 


Ml-48 


3.58 


2.40 


0.006 


10030 


Ml-50 


2.80 


2.80 


0.050 


5983 


Ml-51 


2.85 


7.50 


0.319 


2287 


Ml-52 


3.90 


4.00 


0.008 


6969 


Ml-53 


2.83 


3.00 


0.053 


5674 


Ml-54 


3.65 


6.50 


0.038 


3813 


Ml-57 


3.01 


4.20 


0.069 


4398 


Ml-58 


2.83 


3.20 


0.060 


5325 


Ml-59 


2.16 


2.30 


0.148 


5419 


Ml-60 


2.11 


1.30 


0.052 


9407 


Ml-63 


3.24 


2.10 


0.010 


9771 


Ml-64 


5.08 


8.50 


0.002 


5640 


Ml-65 


2.77 


1.80 


0.022 


9191 


Ml-66 


2.12 


1.40 


0.059 


8773 


Ml-67 


4.76 


60.20 


0.250 


688 


Ml-73 


2.76 


2.50 


0.043 


6600 


Ml-75 


3.87 


7.00 


0.026 


3929 


Ml-77 


3.41 


4.00 


0.025 


5549 


Ml-79 


4.68 


15.00 


0.019 


2652 


Ml-80 


3.41 


4.00 


0.025 


5549 


M2-2 


2.96 


3.50 


0.054 


5153 


M2-7 


3.96 


4.00 


0.007 


7157 


M2-8 


2.90 


1.90 


0.018 


9262 


M2-9 


4.64 


23.00 


0.048 


1705 


M2-11 


2.56 


1.40 


0.021 


10750 


M2-13 


2.29 


0.80 


0.013 


16610 


M2-15 


3.40 


2.90 


0.013 


7623 


M2-16 


3.07 


2.70 


0.025 


7035 


M2-17 


3.81 


4.00 


0.010 


6664 


M2-18 


2.18 


0.80 


0.017 


15740 


M2-19 


3.25 


2.50 


0.014 


8261 


M2-21 


2.59 


1.50 


0.023 


10160 


M2-22 


3.41 


2.60 


0.010 


8546 


M2-23 


3.04 


4.40 


0.070 


4262 


M2-24 


4.19 


3.40 


0.003 


9347 


M2-26 


3.99 


3.50 


0.005 


8294 


M2-27 


2.14 


1.00 


0.029 


12400 


M2-28 


3.29 


2.20 


0.010 


9540 



22 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


r 


e 


pa 


Dssv 
[pc] 


M2-29 


3.59 


2.80 


0.008 


8632 


M2-30 


3.06 


2.00 


0.014 


9444 


M2-33 


2.87 


2.00 


0.021 


8668 


M2-36 


3.27 


3.40 


0.025 


6117 


M2-38 


3.90 


4.00 


0.008 


6969 


M2-39 


3.11 


1.60 


0.008 


12080 


M2-40 


2.87 


2.50 


0.033 


6942 


M2-42 


3.06 


2.00 


0.014 


9444 


M2-44 


3.07 


4.00 


0.054 


4756 


M2-45 


2.47 


3.20 


0.139 


4502 


M2-46 


3.81 


2.20 


0.003 


12140 


M2-47 


3.14 


4.10 


0.049 


4788 


M2-48 


2.73 


1.60 


0.019 


10160 


M2-50 


3.51 


2.30 


0.006 


10120 


M2-51 


4.58 


19.60 


0.041 


1941 


M2-52 


4.15 


7.00 


0.014 


4454 


M2-53 


4.56 


10.00 


0.011 


3773 


M2-54 


2.10 


0.50 


0.008 


24270 


M2-55 


4.93 


20.00 


0.019 


2232 


M3-1 


3.72 


5.60 


0.024 


4571 


M3-2 


4.32 


3.80 


0.003 


8930 


M3-3 


4.42 


6.10 


0.006 


5810 


M3-4 


4.90 


6.90 


0.002 


6392 


M3-5 


3.62 


3.40 


0.011 


7208 


M3-6 


2.87 


4.10 


0.091 


4222 


M3-7 


3.14 


3.10 


0.028 


6320 


M3-8 


3.12 


2.70 


0.022 


7206 


M3-9 


3.91 


8.40 


0.035 


3324 


M3-10 


2.55 


1.60 


0.029 


9334 


M3-11 


3.67 


3.60 


0.011 


6965 


M3-12 


3.29 


2.70 


0.015 


7780 


M3-14 


3.24 


3.60 


0.030 


5699 


M3-16 


3.41 


3.30 


0.017 


6727 


M3-17 


2.88 


1.50 


0.012 


11570 


M3-19 


3.88 


3.50 


0.006 


7870 


M3-20 


2.60 


2.00 


0.040 


7655 


M3-22 


3.64 


3.20 


0.009 


7714 


M3-23 


3.71 


6.00 


0.028 


4253 


M3-26 


3.79 


3.50 


0.008 


7550 



23 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


r 


d 

11 


pa 


Dssv 

[pc] 


M3-28 


3.40 


4.50 


0.033 


4903 


M3-29 


3.55 


4.10 


0.019 


5794 


M3-30 


4.61 


8.60 


0.007 


4484 


M3-32 


3.68 


3.80 


0.012 


6627 


M3-33 


3.68 


3.00 


0.007 


8389 


M3-34 


3.03 


2.80 


0.029 


6649 


M3-36 


3.47 


1.60 


0.003 


14250 


M3-37 


2.99 


1.10 


0.005 


16610 


M3-38 


2.19 


0.90 


0.021 


14060 


M3-39 


3.06 


9.00 


0.284 


2098 


M3-40 


2.57 


1.30 


0.018 


11630 


M3-41 


2.37 


2.10 


0.075 


6556 


M3-42 


4.14 


4.50 


0.006 


6901 


M3-43 


2.73 


1.90 


0.027 


8528 


M3-52 


4.68 


6.00 


0.003 


6648 


M3-54 


3.59 


2.80 


0.008 


8632 


M4-1 


2.72 


2.20 


0.037 


7344 


M4-2 


3.28 


3.00 


0.019 


6966 


M4-7 


3.01 


2.90 


0.033 


6366 


M4-9 


4.67 


22.10 


0.042 


1794 


M4-14 


3.67 


3.70 


0.012 


6756 


M4-18 


2.87 


1.90 


0.019 


9133 


Mel-1 


2.73 


2.40 


0.043 


6757 


Me2-1 


3.18 


3.00 


0.024 


6665 


My60 


2.98 


3.80 


0.060 


4803 


MyCnlS 


3.18 


6.30 


0.106 


3165 


Mzl 


4.04 


12.90 


0.061 


2299 


Mz2 


3.85 


11.50 


0.075 


2364 


Mz3 


3.00 


12.70 


0.649 


1446 


NAl 


3.37 


4.00 


0.027 


5464 


PB2 


2.35 


1.50 


0.040 


9098 


PB3 


2.85 


3.50 


0.070 


4893 


PB4 


3.25 


5.60 


0.071 


3680 


PB6 


3.61 


5.50 


0.030 


4419 


PBS 


2.98 


2.50 


0.026 


7299 


PB9 


3.31 


4.50 


0.040 


4706 


PBIO 


3.11 


4.00 


0.050 


4830 


PC12 


2.23 


0.90 


0.019 


14350 


PC14 


3.21 


3.50 


0.030 


5796 



24 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


r 


9 


pa 


Dssv 

[pc] 


PC17 


3.23 


2.50 


0.015 


8180 


PC19 


2.49 


1.40 


0.025 


10390 


PC23 


2.43 


1.10 


0.018 


12860 


PC24 


3.14 


2.50 


0.018 


7856 


Pel-5 


2.71 


5.50 


0.233 


2932 


Pel-6 


3.11 


3.60 


0.040 


5380 


Pel-11 


4.01 


4.50 


0.008 


6493 


Pel-12 


4.63 


6.00 


0.003 


6484 


Pel-13 


4.21 


3.50 


0.003 


9186 


Pel-15 


3.25 


2.50 


0.014 


8249 


Pel-17 


3.91 


3.50 


0.006 


7997 


Pel-19 


3.51 


2.20 


0.006 


10570 


Pel-20 


3.14 


3.20 


0.029 


6141 


Pel-21 


3.39 


4.30 


0.030 


5123 


Pe2-12 


4.10 


2.50 


0.002 


12190 


Pe2-15 


2.88 


1.30 


0.009 


13360 


PHL932 


6.92 


135.00 


0.009 


828 


Psl 


2.93 


1.80 


0.014 


10000 


Pu-1 


5.80 


33.00 


0.007 


2024 


PWl 


7.83 


200.00 


0.085 


416 


Sal-8 


3.46 


2.80 


0.011 


8099 


Sa2-21 


5.82 


20.00 


0.002 


3376 


Sa2-22 


4.15 


4.00 


0.004 


7818 


Shl-89 


4.53 


19.00 


0.043 


1959 


Shl-118 


5.80 


57.50 


0.021 


1161 


Sh2-71 


5.18 


49.80 


0.066 


1006 


Sh2-207 


5.12 


100.00 


0.300 


489 


Sh2-266 


4.49 


33.50 


0.145 


1091 


Snl 


3.11 


1.50 


0.007 


12890 


Spl 


4.84 


36.00 


0.075 


1192 


Sp3 


4.32 


17.80 


0.061 


1895 


Tel 


3.18 


7.50 


0.147 


2669 


Th2-A 


3.95 


11.50 


0.060 


2471 


Th3-10 


2.13 


1.00 


0.029 


12330 


Th3-19 


2.98 


1.00 


0.004 


18210 


Th3-25 


2.26 


0.90 


0.018 


14500 


Th3-26 


3.64 


3.30 


0.010 


7480 


Th4-5 


3.49 


3.50 


0.016 


6573 


VV-47 


6.88 


190.00 


0.019 


578 



25 



Table 1 — Continued 



Name 


T 


e 

n 


pa 


Dssv 
[pc] 


VVl-2 


5.41 


130.00 


0.265 


428 


VVl-4 


4.46 


63.20 


0.553 


570 


VVl-5 


5.02 


162.00 


1.002 


288 


VVl-7 


6.03 


124.00 


0.057 


600 


VVl-8 


4.72 


45.00 


0.156 


901 


VV3-4 


2.38 


0.60 


0.006 


23040 


Vyl-1 


3.12 


3.10 


0.029 


6281 


Vyl-2 


3.26 


2.30 


0.012 


9002 


Vyl-4 


3.20 


2.00 


0.010 


10100 


Vy2-1 


2.59 


1.90 


0.038 


7997 


Vy2-3 


3.85 


2.30 


0.003 


11820 


We-1 


5.38 


9.50 


0.001 


5796 


We-2 


3.63 


46.00 


2.000 


534 


We-6 


6.68 


31.00 


0.001 


3233 


We2-5 


6.18 


97.00 


0.025 


820 


We2-262 


6.80 


65.00 


0.003 


1625 


YM29 


6.06 


307.50 


0.327 


245 



^This is the 5GHz flux when available, 
otherwise equivalent 5GHz flux from H/?. 



26 



Table 2 
Individual Distances of Galactic PNe 



Name 


Bind 


CTD 


T 


DcKS 


Dssv 


Method^ 


Ref^ 




[pc] 


[pc] 




[pc] 


[pc] 






A7 


676 


+267 
-150 


6.28 


216 


218 


P 


Hea07 


A 24 


521 


+ 112 
-79 


6.54 


525 


530 


P 


Hea07 


A 31 


568 


+ 131 
-90 


6.97 


233 


235 


P 


Hea07 


BD+30 


2680 


810 


2.1 


1162 


3034 


E 


HTB93 


IC289 


2190 


1630 


3.81 


1434 


1448 


R 


KL85 


IC 1747 


2450 


1150 


3.12 


2937 


2991 


R 


KL85 


IC 2448 


1410 


640 


3.17 


3947 


3984 


E 


Pea02 


HE 2-131 


590 


180 


2.03 


1413 


3666 


P 


C99 


K 1-14 


3000 




6.2 


3378 


3413 


P 


C99 


K 1-22 


1330 




6.45 


988 


997 


P 


C99 


Mz2 


2160 




3.85 


2341 


2363 


P 


C99 


NGC 2392 


1600 


130 


3.93 


1247 


1258 


E 


LL68 


NGC 2452 


3570 


560 


3.81 


2811 


2838 


R 


GPP86 


NGC 2792 


1910 


220 


3.16 


3021 


3050 


R 


GPP86 


NGC 2818 


1855 


200 


4.69 


1979 


1998 


CM 


CHW03 


NGC 3132 


770 




3.94 


1251 


1263 


P 


C99 


NGC 3211 


1910 


500 


3.51 


2873 


2901 


R 


GPP86 


NGC 3242 


420 


160 


3.22 


1083 


1094 


E 


HTB95 


NGC 3918 


2240 


840 


2.62 


1010 


1639 


R 


GPP86 


NGC 5189 


1730 


530 


4.59 


540 


546 


R 


GPP86 


NGC 5315 


2620 


1030 


1.94 


1242 


3177 


R 


GPP86 


NGC 6210 


1570 


400 


3.01 


2025 


2281 


E 


HTB95 


NGC 6302 


1600 


600 


2.77 


525 


741 


E 


GRM93 


NGC 6565 


1000 


440 


3.29 


4616 


4660 


R 


GPP86 


NGC 6567 


1680 


170 


2.68 


2367 


3610 


R 


GPP86 


NGC 6572 


703 


95 


2.16 


705 


1736 


E 


HTB95 


NGC 6720 


704 


+445 
-196 


4.1 


872 


880 


P 


Hea07 


NGC 6741 


1540 


770 


2.49 


2047 


3727 


R 


KL85 


NGC 6853 


379 


+54 
-42 


4.94 


262 


264 


P 


Hca07 


NGC 6894 


1090 


110 


4.5 


1653 


1669 


R 


KL85 


NGC 7009 


1400 




3.03 


1201 


1325 


E 


Sea04 


NGC 7026 


1450 


840 


2.91 


1902 


2352 


R 


KL85 


NGC 7027 


790 




1.46 


273 


632 


P 


HTB95 


NGC 7293 


219 


+27 
-21 


5.7 


157 


159 


P 


Hea07 


NGC 7354 


2460 


1440 


2.83 


1271 


1697 


R 


KL85 


NGC 7662 


790 


750 


2.57 


1163 


1962 


E 


HT96 


PS 1 


1.23e+4 


600 


2.93 


8380 


1.0e-h4 


CM 


ABLOO 


PwWe 1 


365 


+47 
-37 


7.83 


141 


416 


P 


Hea07 


Sp3 


2380 




4.32 


1877 


1895 


P 


C99 



27 



Table 2 — Continued 



Name 



Dind 

[pc] 



0-D 

[pc] 



DcKS 

[pc] 



Dssv 
[pc] 



Method^ Refb 



^^P: parallax; CM: cluster membership; E: expansion; R: 
reddening. 

'"ABLOO: Alves et al. 2000; CHW03: Chen et al. 2003 
C99: CiarduUo et al. 1999; GPP86: Gathier et al. 1996 
GRM93: Gomez et al. 1993; HTB93: Hajian et al. 1993 
HTB95: Hajian et al. 1995; HT96: Hajian & Terzian 1996 
Hea07: Harris et al. 2007; KL85: Kaler & Lutz 1985; LL68 
Liller & Liller 1968; Pea02: Palen et al. 2002: Sea04: Sab- 
badin et al. 2004. 



28 



Table 3 
Comparison of Statistical and Individual Distances 



Rcf. 




Method 


Rxy 


< ^ >Gal 


<D, 


tat > — -DlMC 

-Dlmc 


<-Dstat>— i^SMC 

-DsMC 


SSV 

Old scales 


/XT 




0.99 


0.26 




0.01 


0.01 



CKS 

vdSZ 

Z95 

BLOl 

SB96 



liT 0.97 0.32 

log Tb - log RpN 0.74 0.86 

log Mion - log RPN 0.70 1.10 

log Mion - log RpN 0.61 1.35 

log I - log RpN 0.95 0.46 



LMC/SMC calibrations 



0.04 
0.13 
0.19 
0.12 
0.02 



0.05 
0.12 
0.22 
0.12 
0.02 



this paper 
this paper 
this paper 



log Tb - log RpN 0.82 

log Mion - log RpN 0.80 

log I - log RpN 0.96 



0.74 


0.07 


0.02 


0.72 


0.11 


0.08 


0.36 


0.03 


0.02 



29 



M 
_0 

^-1 



"^ o ^ 



*4A^ *_ 




o * 



Fig. 1. — Plotted are log fi versus r for the sam- 
ple of LMC PNe observed with the HST. Sym- 
bols indicate morphology types: Round (open cir- 
cles), Elliptical (asterisks), Bipolar core (triangles) 
and Bipolar (squares). The thinning sequence is 
clearly defined for t <2.1. The solid line reflect 
CKS calibration, the broken line is the new cali- 
bration (SSV). 



110 

o 




o * oo 



Fig. 2. — Same as in Figure 1, but for the SMC 
PNe. 



30 




o°„Cb 
o o 

o ^s»°'2) 



k*^ "^ *> OqO o o 
"o ^ * o o „ 

o o 

o o 

& o 



o 



o 




Fig. 3.— LMC (open symbols) and SMC (filled 
symbols) PN, all morphologies except bipolar PN 
are plotted. Solid line: our new calibration for the 
Magellanic Cloud PNe. 



Fig. 4. — The Galactic PNe of known distances 
plotted on the r - log /i plane. Lines as in Figure 
3. Symbols denote the method used for individual 
distance determination. Filled circles: P; filled 
squares: CM; open circles: R; open triangles: E. 



31 




O 3 



log Dj^^ [pc] 



o 



Q 



"1 "T-r 



O 

o 



CM 



o 
o 



"1 ^~r 






M 



6 



2 4 

T 



Fig. 5. — Comparison of statistical distances form 
our new calibration (SSV) with individual dis- 
tances of Table 2. Symbols represent the individ- 
ual distance determination method, as in Fig. 5. 
Solid line: 1:1. Broken lines represent the 30% 
differences between statistical and individual dis- 
tances. 



Fig. 6. — Relative differences between SSV statis- 
tical and individual PN distances, as a function of 
T, separated in the panels by individual distance 
method. Symbols as in Fig. 6. Vertical lines de- 
notes the r of the thick to thin transition for the 
CKS and the SSV scales. 



32 



Q 
I 1 





& 






^A 








A 








X 


& 




_ 


O 


A O 








1 


i 


1 



3 4 

log Di„, 



Fig. 7. — Relative differences between statistical 
and individual PN distances, plotted against the 
individual distances, for the Magellanic Cloud PN- 
calibrated scales of CKS (filled symbols), vdSZ 
(triangles), BLOl (crosses) and SB96 (pentagons). 



33